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Thread: How is the food in France?

  1. #1
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    How is the food in France?

    I always hear people raving about Italian food. The only French foods I've tried are baked goods so I have very limited knowledge. I've been wondering about the food in Paris. What was your favorite meal there? How was your overall experience dining in Paris? Share your stories here.

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    Food In France Regions

    I live in Bordeaux which has fantastic dishes. The Bordeaux specialities are duck and seafood. You can easily get foie gras, margret de canard (smoked duck breast) and confit de canard (duck cooked in its own fat) at any supermarket or food store here and it tastes delicious. The locals eat a lot of raw oysters with a squeeze of lemon and white wine. The also like mussels poached in a white wine sauce served with French fries (it's called moules frites). Steak tartare is very commonly eaten, it's raw beef steak minced and mixed with mustard, tabasco sauce, gerkins, Worcestershire sauce and raw egg yolks and is eaten with salad and fries. If you come in April and May, the dish to try is lamprey stew - an eel-like fish cooked in wine sauce with leeks. The seafood platters are huge as well and people can buy them ready cooked and eat them right at the Sunday Market in the Capucins area in the city center. They've got tiny blanched shrimp, oysters, langoustines, whelks (little sea snails), mussels and more prawns served on a bed of ice.

    This is just a preview of one tiny corner of France. There is a huge variety of food in France and you've just scratched the surface!

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    @BrianWolfe I've visited New Orleans and a lot of the dishes you named were featured on menus there. I suppose that would make sense since the city is heavily influenced by France. I've had char-broiled oysters with lemon and white wine sauce. That was utterly divine. I've also had poached mussels with fries. I have yet to try snails. I guess i'm a little intimidated by them. Yes, I have just scratched the surface. Even with my very limited experience in New Orleans, I know those dishes were modified with Cajun and African influence. You managed to make the offerings sound so delicious. Hopefully, I will get the change to visit in April/May of next year. (Not that food is the most important thing, but it's certainly a plus)

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    Traditional Food In France

    I second visiting Bordeaux. The duck I had while vacationing there was absolutely fantastic; melted right in my mouth, truly the best I've ever had anywhere in the world. The seafood is also fantastic! I did however order steak in one particular restaurant that was completely overdone and then when served to me a 2nd time - basically raw; though I think this was a restaurant issue as opposed to a Bordeaux issue. Definitely would go there again - certainly IF YOU DO GO, check out the duck/seafood.

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    Absolutely! Confit de canard is usually done very well there (it's the regional specialty) and yes, it does fall apart and just melts in your mouth. I normally don't eat beef in Bordeaux, but I hear some restaurants do very good entrecote (ribs). There is a restaurant that I love to go to called L'Autre Petit Bois" close to the main shopping districts that serve amazing pate of foie gras on toasts (they're huge!) with walnut salad and fig jam! It tastes heavenly and the foie gras just melts on your tongue. And it only costs 7-8 euros per plate!

    Do check out the duck and seafood dishes in Southwest France!

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianWolfe View Post
    I live in Bordeaux which has fantastic dishes. The Bordeaux specialities are duck and seafood. You can easily get foie gras, margret de canard (smoked duck breast) and confit de canard (duck cooked in its own fat) at any supermarket or food store here and it tastes delicious. The locals eat a lot of raw oysters with a squeeze of lemon and white wine. The also like mussels poached in a white wine sauce served with French fries (it's called moules frites). Steak tartare is very commonly eaten, it's raw beef steak minced and mixed with mustard, tabasco sauce, gerkins, Worcestershire sauce and raw egg yolks and is eaten with salad and fries. If you come in April and May, the dish to try is lamprey stew - an eel-like fish cooked in wine sauce with leeks. The seafood platters are huge as well and people can buy them ready cooked and eat them right at the Sunday Market in the Capucins area in the city center. They've got tiny blanched shrimp, oysters, langoustines, whelks (little sea snails), mussels and more prawns served on a bed of ice.

    This is just a preview of one tiny corner of France. There is a huge variety of food in France and you've just scratched the surface!
    That sounds incredible...I was going to say, I go beyond desserts for sure to at least consider savory food when thinking of France! My friend is very interested in french cooking and does a lot of with different herbs and seasonings, lavender in particular and I find that pretty interesting .

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    A friend of mine has recently enrolled in a French cooking class and she has only nice things to say about how intricate the preparations involved in cooking. It is very well managed according to her and the cooking in itself is a talent/skill that you need to put into practice in order to be able to create a meal that would be well appreciated. Like me, she is somewhat inclined to preparing home cooked meals over eating out so I am pretty sure that with more classes, she will be able to invite me over for dinner. When that time comes, I will have more information to share about this.

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    Spices And Herbs In French Food

    French cooking is very intricate. I was taught how to make rabbit stew by a French gentleman who lives next door. It actually uses lardons (salted fatty bacon) for flavoring and lots of bay leaf, thyme and rosemary. The French also use a lot of onions and garlic in their cooking.

    I also learnt how to cook small shrimp as an appetizers. Boil them in water with white wine, star anise, bay leaf, sea salt and pepper. Serve chilled.

    I also love duck patties made with minced duck breast (leave a little bit of the fat for flavor), bread soaked in milk, herbes de Provence and salt.

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    Ah, rabbit stew . I was tricked into trying it initially but it is actually very good. That's great that you've learned so much...I'm a huge foodie and really want to try various styles of cooking.

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    I had a friend who learned how to prepare foie gras from his father who was a retired chef. I never had the time to learn from him but I did taste his foie gras and it was delicious on toasts with some white wine!

    Another region that has excellent cuisine is the extreme southwest, the famous (or as some might say, infamous) Basque region that straddles the French and Spanish border. The food is quite spicy with strong flavors. If you have a chance, you need to try chistorra or txistorra in Basque. It's a spicy sausage made from pork and the flavors are just wild!

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    I was in Paris for a little bit last year, and absolutely loved the food! I can't really compare it to Italy though, as I've never been there. Of course, the croissants are delicious too! As people have mentioned, the food is very intricate and I'd love to go back there.

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    One of my favorite places to go in Paris is at Rue Mouffetard (the Latin Quarter). It's called Au P'tit Grec and serves Breton-style crepes and gallettes (thick salty pancakes) with a dash of Greek influence. The gallettes were out of this world. For between 4 and 5 euros you could have a massive buckwheat pancake topped with egg, cheese and ham. You could also ask them to add in a salad and tomatoes for free!

    If you're ever in Paris, give this place a try!

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    Cost Of Food In France

    French food is, as a rule, exquisite. Cheap, tasty, top quality ingredients and generally far better than in the UK.

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    I absolutely love French food! I visited Europe last summer, and my absolute favorite food was from France. There was a lot of great restaurants in France, and I would definitely have to agree that French food was very exquisite. I had my first beef tar-tar in France, and it was definitely a one of a kind experience.

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    Last year I visited the Côte d'Azur and I had Blanquette de veau (veal ragout) as one of my dinners. It tasted delicious! If you plan on traveling to France you should have absolutely no worries about going hungry. But they also eat just regular stuff like 'we' do, in St. Tropez I had a Croque-Monsieur (similar to Grilled Cheese but with a fancy name ), which tasted pretty well. In my opinion, it doesn't matter what the french cook. It'll most likely taste great either way.

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    Another favorite dish of mine (and one that's only available in Bordeaux between February and April) is lamproie a la Bordelaise. It's lamprey (a prehistoric-looking fish with nasty teeth that drinks the blood from other fishes) that has been bled to death, chopped into meaty chunks and then stewed in it's own blood, with red wine, leeks, onions, garlic, cloves, thyme, bay leaf, Bayonne ham and Armagnac. It tastes much better than it looks!

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    Some Good Places To Eat In Paris

    There is a place called L'assiette, on the 14th arrondisement in Paris, on Rue de Chateau. It is a tiny space that serves food with big flavors!! It is a traditional French bistro, done with a little more sophistication. They specialty is homemade foie gras (which is available for retail also), blue shrimp tartare, their cassoulet, veal head with sauce gribiche, creme caramel with salted butter, floating islands, and Grand Marnier Souffle. They have specials that change according to what is in season. The time that we ate there it was fall, and they had wild duck on special, as well as hare with truffles and foie gras and truffles, and they also had this salad of herring, frisee, and lamb neck. It was absolutely fantastic! Such simple fare, but it was done so well!

    We live in the south of France, in Cannes, and our favorite restaurant is a place called La Merenda, in Nice, close to the old town. Unfortunately the restaurants that we have in our little city is mediocre at best, but the food that we get in our market is incredible. The vegetables are so sweet, the fruits are always ripe and bursting with flavor, and our butchers have excellent quality meats. That more than makes up for it.

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    Re: How is the food in France?

    Wow that sounds great! You made me hungry. I have never been to France and would love to try some of their food. I've been to France in Disney and tried this delicious garlic type bread. Do you eat a lot of snails in France? I bet they don't taste that good.

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    Re: How is the food in France?

    Yes, I've heard of L'Assiette! I've heard nothing but rave reviews from friends who've dined there. Another great restaurant at affordable prices is Chartier, in the 9th Arrondissement. No reservations, all customers are meant to sit together in cosy family style on large tables. Good food at affordable prices. A great way to meet people too!
    epliu likes this.

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    Re: How is the food in France?

    French food is lovely . I find its so tasty and full of flavour. I love Ratatouille. It's nice when its served as a main dish or at the side of a dish. I have been to a number of restaurants in Paris and I could eat French food all day and everyday

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    Re: How is the food in France?

    Quote Originally Posted by amurleopard27 View Post
    Wow that sounds great! You made me hungry. I have never been to France and would love to try some of their food. I've been to France in Disney and tried this delicious garlic type bread. Do you eat a lot of snails in France? I bet they don't taste that good.
    I happen to like snails. I guess with a lot of things, if one is not used to it, then one might find it strange or one might not like it. It is definitely worth a try, in my opinion. Try it twice, then you can give your verdict.

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    Re: How is the food in France?

    I found the food absolutely amazing and although I consider myself adventurous, I did get a little squeamish at some of the items on French menus. But I thought, if I am going to try something this odd, why not in Paris? I had bone marrow, which was shockingly amazing. I also tried escargot, which was delicious, but I probably wouldn't eat it again. Unless I was at this same fantastic place in Paris. And I also tried steak tartare, delicious to my surprise, but you have to be a serious meat-eater to enjoy this one. I would say that French food is truly amazing and they do use everything in such artistic ways...even eggs!
    Enjoy your trip!

 

 

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